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Master Gardeners Colorado Master Gardener Volunteers assist Colorado State University Extension staff in delivering knowledge-based information about home gardening to foster successful gardening.  Participants receive intensive Colorado Master Gardener Training during the 10-week course.

The Colorado Master Gardener (CMG) audience is exclusively home gardeners. CMG volunteers serve by answering gardening questions, staffing diagnostic clinics, teaching gardening classes, writing newspaper articles, and mentoring community gardening and greening projects.

2015 CMG Training

The majority of CMG training courses will be taught via CSU’s well-developed Distance Education Program.  All classes will have local staff as facilitators and experienced Colorado Master Gardeners will be available to answer questions and assist with hands-on activities.

Emerald Ash Borer Found in Colorado

ash borerEmerald Ash Borer, an invasive insect responsible for the death and decline of tens of millions of ash trees in 21 states, has been detected in Colorado by the Colorado Department of Agriculture. According to Dr. Whitney Cranshaw, Extension Entomologist, Colorado State University, this invasive insect has been detected in Boulder.  Here is an excerpt from a memo dated SSeptember 13, 2013 from Dr. Cranshaw:
‘If you are not aware of emerald ash borer, it is arguably the most devastating invasive insect to have breached the North American shores in many decades. Since its accidental introduction into Michigan and detection in 2002 it has spread across much of the eastern half of the US and Canada killing tens of millions of ash trees. There is every reason to believe that before this invasive has completed its effects it will likely eliminate essentially every ash tree where the insect is present, causing extraordinary ecological and economic damage. All species of ash
trees native to North America are susceptible, including the very widely planted green and white ash used as street trees in Colorado.

At present the Colorado Department of Agriculture and federal agencies involved in tracking exotic insects are working to determine the extent of the present infestation. We can hope that it is limited to the single site, but expect a greatly intensified effort in the upcoming year to better delimit the current range of EAB in Colorado.’  More information can be obtained by contacting the CSU Extension/Pueblo County office.

 

Photo courtesy of David Cappaert

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